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How-to: Rebuilding your shocks

Discussion in 'Suspension and Shocks Section' started by Martijn, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. Martijn

    Martijn Well-Known Member

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    Rebuilding your shocks.

    Shocks are important because they decide how your car will handle and act when you jump, ride on bumps they also decide how much grip your have.
    Bad shocks are shocks with air in them or if you run a to soft spring with a to heavy oil. Your shocks are definitely something you want to maintain, rebuild the most.

    [​IMG]

    What you’ll need:
    • Hexdriver 0.05
    • Pliers
    • Brush or toothbrush
    • Shock oil
    • Paper rag and a towel
    • Cotton swab
    • Shock stand
    • O-rings (optional)
    • Shock rebuild kit (optional)
    • Team Associated Green Slime (optional)
    • Team Associated Shock tool (if you are using the older V1 shocks)
    Step 1:
    Remove your shocks form you car. Clean them using a brush or toothbrush.Also remove the spring cup, spring and collar

    [​IMG]

    Step 2:
    Take of the shock cap with the tools you get with your car or like I did with the shock tools form RPM. Pour the shock oil in a bottle.
    Tip: I use the old shock oil for lubricating my bikechain. Works pretty good.

    [​IMG]

    Step 3:
    Let your shocks sit for a while so the remaining oil can pour out your shocks.

    [​IMG]

    Step 4:
    Take a piece from your paper rag and clean the shock cap. Make sure all the oil is gone.

    [​IMG]

    Step 5:
    Take your pliers and squeeze them together (use the flat surface, not the one with the teeth) so you can remove the shock ball end. Make sure you don’t make scratches on the shaft since they can damage your O-rings.

    [​IMG]

    Step 6:
    Remove the shock shaft where the piston is attached to. Also don’t forget to get the shock limiters.

    [​IMG]

    Step 7:
    Remove your O-rings and spacer with your hexdriver. (If you are using the V1 shocks, the removal of the O-rings is explained on the end of this article)

    [​IMG]

    Step 8:
    Take a cotton swab and clean the place where the O-rings go.

    [​IMG]

    Step 9:
    Take some paper for your rag and push it in the shock body. If it’s full of paper, spin the shock body so all the oil is gone.

    [​IMG]

    Step 10:
    Clean the shock shaft and piston with a paper rag. Again make sure there is no oil left.

    [​IMG]

    Step 11:
    Take a cotton swab and clean the plastic cab. There could be some dirt/oil in there.

    [​IMG]

    Step 12:
    Now everything is cleaned, we can start assembling the shocks.
    Take your old or new O-rings, put a little drop on them and squeeze your fingers together so the Green Slime is on the whole O-ring.
    If you don’t have Green Slime, simply put a drop of shock oil on them.
    Do this for both the O-rings. Don’t forget to put the black spacer in-between them! Screw the plastic cab on the shock body.

    [​IMG]

    Step 13:
    Put a drop of shock oil on the threads of the shock shaft so they don’t damaged the O-rings. If the shaft is back in place, you can screw the ball end back on the shaft.

    [​IMG]

    Step 14:
    Take you car stand/shock stand and fill the shocks ¾ with shock oil.
    Move the shaft up and down. You’ll notice there will be some air bubbles in the shock. Let the shock sit for 10min so they will disappear.
    Meanwhile you could also disassemble the 2 other shocks

    [​IMG]
     
    Voltage_Drop likes this.
  2. Martijn

    Martijn Well-Known Member

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    Step 15:
    Now the air bubbles are gone. Fill the shock full of shock oil.
    I fill them a little bit too full.


    [​IMG]


    Step 16:
    Remove the screw of the shock cap and fill it with 2-3 drips of shock oil.


    [​IMG]


    Step 17:
    Screw the shock cap on the shock body. There could come some oil out of the shock. Wipe this off.


    [​IMG]


    Step 18:
    It can get a bit messy right now. Take a towel and put it around the shaft. Put the shaft gently up. And hold it there.


    [​IMG]


    Step 19:
    Screw the screw in the shock body and wipe the oil that has come out of the shock off.


    [​IMG]


    Step 20:
    Pump the shaft a few times and let it rebound. Rebuild your other shock also and if you’ve done this right, they should rebound the same.
    Mine was about 3mm, which I like to run.


    [​IMG]


    Step 21:
    Screw the collars back on the shock, put the spring on it and the spring cup.


    [​IMG]



    Building your V1 shocks:

    If your run the V1 shocks, I’ll explain it here how you can rebuild them.
    Most of the process it the same, only the removal and placement of the O-rings.

    Step 1:
    Take you shock tool, try to feel the last spacer and push it out.
    This can take a while.


    [​IMG]


    Step 2:
    If you’ve cleaned all the shims, put them again on the shock tool in this order.


    [​IMG]


    Step 3:
    Put a drop of oil on the O-rings. Put the tool in your shock body and push the shock body down. If you hear a ‘SNAP’ that’s the sound to let you know they are in place.


    [​IMG]


    Now just put the shaft in there, fill it up with oil and bleed it like the V2 shocks.
     
    Voltage_Drop likes this.
  3. LeeSc10

    LeeSc10 Well-Known Member

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    Very nice write up. :thumbsup:
     
    Martijn likes this.
  4. Jessica @ Pro-Line

    Jessica @ Pro-Line Active Member

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  5. B3Master

    B3Master Well-Known Member

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    What about ones without a bleeder hole? How do you (or did you) bleed those?

    To make this write up complete for us guys without the shock bleeder hole option.:D
     
  6. Martijn

    Martijn Well-Known Member

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    Well, put the cap half on and push the shaft up.
    Let all the oil flow out from underneath the cap. And check rebound and if too much, repeat till it's right.
     
  7. B3Master

    B3Master Well-Known Member

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    Till this day, I would do as you stated. I would fill the shock body with oil till it bulges out when shaft is compressed, then I would extend the shaft and put 2 or 3 drops in the cap, screw it half way and bleed by compressing the shaft removing all air from inside, then tighten the cap, if i feel any hydrolic lock after totally screwing the cap, i would reopen the cap while the shaft is compressed and reclose it, that tad bit allows any extra air and/or oil out.

    However, that process gives us a perfectly air free shock body, which rebounds when fully extended, and hence shock will tend to want to be in its normal state which is half extended, which in reality means the shocks are softer than they should be (they are doing half the compressing work). After breaking in the shocks, air will seep through the o rings since the normal relaxed state of the shock is fully extended having the spring on there. I want to eliminate that break in process. these are emulsion shocks and they need to have that tad bit of air in there for full extension and full compression. Thats when they are truly consistent. Today I will try to refill as per the B3 manual which states to fill the shock body till the oil is bulging out a tad bit (shaft compressed) and just screw the cap back on, without adding oil in the cap or bleeding out excess oil (if you added the proper amount without over bulging the oil). There has to be air in the shock for it to properly dampen and not stiffen up after breaking in, which means consistent shock till the next time you change oil.

    But, the air free method also insures maximum amount of oil in shock body, and there being vacuum allows any required air to seep through which later becomes perfect and consistent AFTER air has seeped through and shock is broken in. maybe those few strokes are enough to let the required air in, maybe not.

    Just got done doing the rear B3 shocks. well good note there was no rebound after full extension, the bad news there is no rebound when fully compressed, but the shock feels really good and the piston is fully submerged in oil. also its a good way to save some bled oil :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2014
  8. waffleNchicken

    waffleNchicken Well-Known Member

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    I race with a guy that runs his shocks that way, no rebound ext or comp....he loves it, and the t4 does quite well. I run mine with a little rebound once compressed.
     
  9. Charel

    Charel Well-Known Member

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    This is a very nice write up but I would like to discus rebound a little more.
    In the beginning I always used to build my shocks with 100% rebound from compression, but this made the shock feel bouncy and doesn't souk up corners as well. It did how ever make the car jump higher and further.
    I then got the SC10 and build the shocks as per manual with '0' rebound (aka dead shock) and I have to say I like the feel of the shock allot more. Its more controlled in the infield and still jumps good, its just the landings that is now bottoming out sometime after big air, but still acceptable I think.
    With the V2 shocks with bleeder caps It will be difficult to have some rebound build into them, but I think maybe using two stage pistons with a dead shock might be the answer I'm looking for.
    Any thoughts...?
     
  10. Grant

    Grant Well-Known Member

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    I build my BB shocks as per the manual..0 rebound and I love them. I build my 1/8 scale shocks with the shaft fully extended and I get 0 rebound. I was told to put rebound in my 1/8 shocks but couldn't get all the shocks to rebound and the ones that had some weren't consistent with each other....not sure how to get rebound.
     
  11. Charel

    Charel Well-Known Member

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    I like the 0 rebound too, we use it allot in onroad racing.
    Will be nice to hear some more comments on this.
     
  12. Martijn

    Martijn Well-Known Member

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    You can achieve rebound with the bleeder caps but not fully pushing in the shockshaft
     
  13. Grant

    Grant Well-Known Member

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    I tried that but couldn't get a consistent rebound
     
  14. Martijn

    Martijn Well-Known Member

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    I should try it again myself.. I always push them all the way in
     
  15. Charel

    Charel Well-Known Member

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    I think it will be a little difficult with the bleeder caps to get a consistent rebound unlike shocks with diaphragm.
     
  16. Grant

    Grant Well-Known Member

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    I was told by other 1/8 drivers that there should be rebound
     
  17. Frank Jaksties

    Frank Jaksties Well-Known Member

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    Your talking 1/8 shocks for some rebound? Try to fill the shock all the way up and compress the shaft until there´s 1/4" space left to be fully compressed. Until then there has to come out shockoil. With that little space left put in the screw and see if you get the same amount of rebound on all 4 shocks. Hope it helps...

    Oh, and 100% rebound on 1/10 shocks lets you have hydroloc at the top for sure. Thats where you start blowing oil out of the seals at the bottom. I build mine always with a 1/4" / 6mm rebound from the top. Not the BB, though. The have a little rebound from beeing fully extended.
     
  18. Grant

    Grant Well-Known Member

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    I will give that a try...Thanks!
     
  19. AERacer

    AERacer Administrator Staff Member Moderator Factory Member

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    I never build my shocks with full rebound... Max 3/4 rebound
     
  20. Grant

    Grant Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't full rebound make the shocks bouncy?
     

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